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TouchingSepak Takraw

“Sepak takraw or kick volleyball, is a sport native to the Malay-Thai Peninsula. Sepak takraw differs from the similar sport of volleyball in its use of a rattan ball and only allowing players to use their feet, knee, chest and head to touch the ball. It is a popular sport in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Philippines.

In Malaysia, the game is called sepak raga or “takraw”. It is also thuck thay (Lao: “twine” and “kick”) while in Thailand it is sometimes called takraw. In Myanmar it is known as chin lone. In the Philippines it is known as sipa, meaning “kick”.

Similar games include footbag net, footvolley, football tennis, bossaball, jianzi and sipa. These similar games all involve keepie uppies.

Earliest historical evidence shows that the game was played in the 15th century's Malacca Sultanate, for it is mentioned in the famous Malay historical text, “The Sejarah Melayu” (Malay Annals). The Malay Annals described in details the incident of Raja Muhammad, a son of Sultan Mansur Shah who was accidentally hit with a rattan ball by Tun Besar, a son of Tun Perak, in a sepak raga game. The ball hit Raja Muhammad's headgear and knocked it down to the ground. In anger, Raja Muhammad immediately stabbed and killed Tun Besar, whereupon some of Tun Besar's kinsmen retaliated and wanted to kill Raja Muhammad. However, Tun Perak managed to restrain them from such an act of treason by saying that he would no longer accept Raja Muhammad as the Sultan's heir. As a result of this incident, Sultan Mansur Shah ordered his son out of Malacca and had him installed as the ruler of Pahang.

In Bangkok, murals at Wat Phra Kaeo which was built in 1785, depict the Hindu god Hanuman playing sepak takraw in a ring with a troop of monkeys. Other historical accounts mention the game earlier during the reign of King Naresuan (1590–1605) of Ayutthaya. The game remained in its circle form for hundreds of years, and the modern version of sepak takraw began taking shape in Thailand sometime during early 1740s. In 1866 the Siam Sports Association drafted the first rules for takraw competition. Four years later, the association introduced the volleyball-style net and held the first public contest. Within just a few years, takraw was introduced to the curriculum in Siamese schools. The game became such a cherished local custom that another exhibition of volleyball-style takraw was staged to celebrate the kingdom’s first constitution in 1933, the year after Thailand abolished absolute monarchy.

Some sources in Indonesia say that “Sepak Takraw” in Indonesia is probably developed from the buginese traditional game which is called “Raga” (the players are called “Pa'Raga”). The “Raga” was originated from Malacca Sultanate, and was popular in South Sulawesi since 19th century. Some men playing “Raga” within a group, the ball is passed from one to another and the man who kicked the ball highest is the winner.

In the Philippines the sport was called “sipa” and along with traditional martial arts survived the three century Spanish colonization. It is a popular sport played by children in Philippines and many other countries. In Myanmar, or Burma, it was dubbed “Chinlone”, in Laos “Kator”, “Cầu mây” in Vietnam and in Indonesia “Raga” or “Sepak Takraw”.

By the 1940s, the net version of the game had spread throughout Southeast Asia, and formal rules were introduced. This sport became officially known as 'sepak takraw'. “Sepak” is the Malay word for kick and “takraw” is the Thai word for a woven ball, therefore sepak takraw quite literally means to kick ball. The choosing of this name for the sport was essentially a compromise between Malaysia and Thailand, the two powerhouse countries of the sport”. – Wikipedia




Thanh Man Chu of Vietnam kicks over the net against of Mao Hui Wang of China during the Round Robin match between Vietnam and China during day two of the ISTAF Sepaktakraw World Cup at Titiwangsa Stadium on July 22, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for UFA Sports)






Siaful Rijal of Indonesia kicks over the net against John Thao of USA during the Round Robin match between Indonesia and USA day two of the ISTAF Sepaktakraw World Cup at Titiwangsa Stadium on July 22, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for UFA Sports)






Pattarapong Yupadee of Thailand kicks over the net during the round robin match between Thailand and Philippines during day one of the ISTAF Sepaktakraw World Cup at Titiwangsa Stadium on July 21, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for UFA Sports)










Shukri Bin Jaineh of Brunei kicks over the net during the round robin match between Australia and Brunei during day one of the ISTAF Sepaktakraw World Cup at Titiwangsa Stadium on July 21, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for UFA Sports)










Hyun Ju Kim of Korea kicks over the net against Yukie Sato of Japan during the round robin match between Korea and Japan during day one of the ISTAF Sepaktakraw World Cup at Titiwangsa Stadium on July 21, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images for UFA Sports)






Sepaktakraw balls are seen during day one of the ISTAF Sepaktakraw World Cup ay Titiwangsa Stadium on July 21, 2011 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)


23 Jul 2011 11:45:00, post received 0 comments